File /Humanist.vol22.txt, message 103


Date: Thu, 03 Jul 2008 08:39:50 +0100
From: "Humanist Discussion Group \(by way of Willard McCarty              <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>\)" <willard-AT-LISTS.VILLAGE.VIRGINIA.EDU>
Subject: 22.101 new on WWW: TL Infobits for June
To: <humanist-AT-Princeton.EDU>


               Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 22, No. 101.
       Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
  www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/humanities/cch/research/publications/humanist.html
                        www.princeton.edu/humanist/
                     Submit to: humanist-AT-princeton.edu



         Date: Thu, 03 Jul 2008 08:34:01 +0100
         From: Carolyn Kotlas <kotlas-AT-email.unc.edu>
         Subject: TL Infobits -- June 2008

TL INFOBITS     June 2008               No. 23          ISSN: 1931-3144

About INFOBITS

INFOBITS is an electronic service of The University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill ITS Teaching and Learning division. Each month the
ITS-TL's Information Resources Consultant monitors and selects from a
number of information and instructional technology sources that come to
her attention and provides brief notes for electronic dissemination to
educators.

NOTE: You can read the Web version of this issue at
http://its.unc.edu/tl/infobits/bitjun08.php

You can read all back issues of Infobits at
http://its.unc.edu/tl/infobits/

......................................................................

Ten Higher Education IT Issues for 2008
Ten Reasons to Adopt IT Innovations
Ten Web Technologies to Watch
The Myth of Multitasking
Papers from a Distance Learning Administration Conference
Games and Learning Resources
Recommended Reading

......................................................................

TEN HIGHER EDUCATION IT ISSUES FOR 2008

The EDUCAUSE Current Issues Committee has released the results of its
ninth annual survey of information technology (IT) issues that concern
higher education. The survey looks at IT in four areas: "(1) issues
that are critical for strategic success; (2) issues that are expected
to increase in significance; (3) issues that demand the greatest amount
of the campus IT leader's time; and (4) issues that require the largest
expenditures of human and fiscal resources." As for the previous five
years, administrative/ERP information systems, funding IT, and security
rank at the top of the list of college and university CIOs' concerns.
This year, security is the number one concern, reflecting the number of
data privacy breaches and threats some institutions have experienced.

The survey results and related materials, including readings related to
each of the ten issues, are available at
http://www.educause.edu/2008IssuesResources/15516

EDUCAUSE is a nonprofit association whose mission is to advance higher
education by promoting the intelligent use of information technology.
The current membership comprises more than 1,900 colleges,
universities, and educational organizations, including 200
corporations, with 15,000 active members. EDUCAUSE has offices in
Boulder, CO, and Washington, DC. Learn more about EDUCAUSE at
http://www.educause.edu/

......................................................................

TEN REASONS TO ADOPT IT INNOVATIONS

"College and university educators in general and . . . IT educators in
particular have a unique set of personal values, motivators,
organizational politics, and alliances that influence technology
adoption decisions. Given the nature of their chosen field, most IT
educators place value on creativity and learning. They have a wide
range of external motivators but many are also self-motivators and
risk-takers. But they also must function within the framework of their
institution's philosophies, resources, and organizational, social, and
political structure."

While some of the reasons listed in "Ten Reasons for IT Educators to be
Early Adopters of IT Innovations" (by Sharlett Gillard, Denice Bailey,
and Ernest Nolan, JOURNAL OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION, vol. 7,
2008) sound humorous, the authors nevertheless take a serious approach
to the question, "Why be an innovator or early adopter?" Some of the
reasons include:

The sun came up today.
          "There is probably nothing more predictable in the physical
world in which we live than the sun rising and setting. In the
professional world of information technology there is probably nothing
more predictable than change itself. . . . The pace may be exhausting,
and fighting a current may sometimes be necessary, but as a general,
relatively predictable practice, just as the sun came up today, we
should welcome change, embrace it, learn to manage it, and be among the
first to integrate it into our professional world."

You read the obituaries and your name was not listed.
          "A failure to adopt all innovations over an extended period of
time . . . could be perceived as resisting rather than discerning or
discriminating and lead to professional death."

If you can't run with the big dogs, stay on the porch.
          "In this 'dog eat dog' world, it is all about being out front:
leadership. If you are not the lead dog, the view never changes and
that alone is a very unpleasant thought. Reflecting on professional
contacts, discussions, and feedback from conference sessions, it is the
consensus of the authors that regardless of where we actually fit in
the product adoption curve, most IT educators seemingly like to believe
that they are relatively up-to-date in the use and application of
information technology."

The complete paper is available at
http://jite.org/documents/Vol7/JITEv7p021-033Gillard257.pdf

The peer-reviewed Journal of Information Technology Education (JITE)
[ISSN 1539-3585 (online) 1547-9714 (print)] is printed annually in a
single volume, but articles are published online when accepted (at
http://jite.org/). The journal is published by the Informing Science
Institute. For more information contact: Informing Science Institute,
131 Brookhill Court, Santa Rosa, California 95409 USA; tel:
707-531-4925; fax: 480-247-5724; Web: http://informingscience.org/

......................................................................

TEN WEB TECHNOLOGIES TO WATCH

"Ten Web Startups to Watch" (TECHNOLOGY REVIEW, July/August 2008)
provides a quick glimpse of the future of Web applications by focusing
on ten new companies and what they are marketing. Their services/tools
are in the areas of voice messaging, microblogging, live broadcasting
from phones, memory aids, and delivering streaming media. The article
is online at http://www.technologyreview.com/Biztech/20923/

Technology Review [ISSN 1099-274X] is published six times a year by
Technology Review, Inc., a Massachusetts Institute of Technology
enterprise. For more information, contact Technology Review, One Main
Street, 7th Floor, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA; tel: 617-475-8000; fax:
617-475-8042; Web: http://www.technologyreview.com/

......................................................................

THE MYTH OF MULTITASKING

"When we talk about multitasking, we are really talking about
attention: the art of paying attention, the ability to shift our
attention, and, more broadly, to exercise judgment about what objects
are worthy of our attention. People who have achieved great things
often credit for their success a finely honed skill for paying
attention."

In her essay "The Myth of Multitasking" (THE NEW ATLANTIS, no. 20,
Spring 2008, pp. 105-10), Christine Rosen cites studies that provide
evidence that multitasking may be influencing the way our brains work
and the way we learn. But it may not be a good thing, resulting in
people who exhibit "very quick but very shallow thinking." Read all the
viewpoints at
http://www.thenewatlantis.com/publications/the-myth-of-multitasking

The New Atlantis: A Journal of Technology & Society [ISSN 1555-5569
(online), ISSN 1543-1215 (print)] is available online at
http://www.thenewatlantis.com/
The Journal is published quarterly by The Ethics and Public Policy
Center, 1015 15th St. NW, Suite 900, Washington, DC 20005 USA; tel:
202-682-1200; fax: 202-408-0632; email: ethics-AT-eppc.org, Web:
http://www.eppc.org/

......................................................................

PAPERS FROM A DISTANCE LEARNING ADMINISTRATION CONFERENCE

The current issue of ONLINE JOURNAL OF DISTANCE LEARNING ADMINISTRATION
(vol. 11, no. 2, Summer 2008) features papers from the Distance
Learning Administration June 2008 conference. The issue is available at
http://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/

Papers include:

"A Strategic Planning Process Model for Distance Education" by Kenneth
          P. Pisel
          "As more institutions seek to implement or expand distance
learning programs, it becomes critical to integrate distance learning
programs into broader strategic visions and plans. Using the informed
opinion from a panel of peer-nominated experts via iterative Delphi
questionnaires, a 10-phased strategic planning process model for
distance education was developed."

"It Takes a Virtual Community: Promoting Collaboration Through Student
          Activities" by Ludmila Battista, Carol Forrey, and Carolyn
          Stevenson
          "This paper [discusses] strategies for developing a sense of
student community at a distance. Topics include: the role of
professional and student organizations in building community; academic
coaching and courses for at-risk students; community building through
student websites; use of Second Life for promoting student leadership
and collaborative activities."

"Instructor's Privacy in Distance (Online) Teaching: Where Do You Draw
          the Line?" by Valerie Storey and Mary Tebes
          "As the number of online classes continues to grow, an
increasing number of articles are being written about student and
program integrity but there is a notable absence of articles or
research focusing on the emerging issue of institutional integrity in
relation to instructors. The ideology of New DEEL's (Democratic Ethical
Educational Leadership) speaks to the ethical basis of online teaching
and this paper delineates an authentic ethical dilemma for which a
universalized and generalized ethical model is proposed to be usefully
applied to all issues involving privacy of participants."

The Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration is a free,
peer-reviewed quarterly electronic journal published by the Distance
and Distributed Education Center, The State University of West Georgia,
1603 Maple Street, Carrollton, GA 30118 USA; email:
distance-AT-westga.edu; Web: http://www.westga.edu/~distance/

......................................................................

GAMES AND LEARNING RESOURCES

The UNC-Chapel Hill Information Technology Service's Teaching and
Learning division has recently added new resources to our
Games4Learning initiative website. Scholars interested in how games can
be used in the curriculum can find links to websites, listservs,
organizations, and readings at
http://learnit.unc.edu/games4learning/resources.php

......................................................................

RECOMMENDED READING

"Recommended Reading" lists items that have been recommended to me or
that Infobits readers have found particularly interesting and/or
useful, including books, articles, and websites published by Infobits
subscribers. Send your recommendations to carolyn_kotlas-AT-unc.edu for
possible inclusion in this column.

"Is Google Making Us Stupid?"
By Nicholas Carr
ATLANTIC MONTHLY, July/August 2008
http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200807/google

"For me, as for others, the Net is becoming a universal medium, the
conduit for most of the information that flows through my eyes and ears
and into my mind. The advantages of having immediate access to such an
incredibly rich store of information are many, and they've been widely
described and duly applauded. 'The perfect recall of silicon memory,'
WIRED's Clive Thompson has written, 'can be an enormous boon to
thinking.' But that boon comes at a price. As the media theorist
Marshall McLuhan pointed out in the 1960s, media are not just passive
channels of information. They supply the stuff of thought, but they
also shape the process of thought. And what the Net seems to be doing
is chipping away my capacity for concentration and contemplation. My
mind now expects to take in information the way the Net distributes it:
in a swiftly moving stream of particles. Once I was a scuba diver in
the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski."

......................................................................

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http://lists.unc.edu/read/rss?forum=infobits

......................................................................

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TL INFOBITS is published by the University of North Carolina at Chapel
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If you have problems subscribing or want to send suggestions for future
issues, contact the editor, Carolyn Kotlas, at kotlas-AT-email.unc.edu.

Article Suggestions

Infobits always welcomes article suggestions from our readers, although
we cannot promise to print everything submitted. Because of our
publishing schedule, we are not able to announce time-sensitive events
such as upcoming conferences and calls for papers or grant
applications.

While we often mention commercial products, publications, and Web
sites, Infobits does not accept or reprint unsolicited advertising
copy. Send your article suggestions to the editor at
kotlas-AT-email.unc.edu.

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Copyright 2008, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ITS
Teaching and Learning. All rights reserved. May be reproduced in any
medium for non-commercial purposes.



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