File /Humanist.vol22.txt, message 179


Date:         Tue, 26 Aug 2008 23:50:00 +0100
From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty-AT-MCCARTY.ORG.UK>
Subject: 22.176 events: Computer Applications in Archaeology; CS and Info Engineering; Mining Greek
To: humanist-AT-Princeton.EDU


               Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 22, No. 176.
       Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                        www.princeton.edu/humanist/
                     Submit to: humanist-AT-princeton.edu

   [1]   From:    Humanist Discussion Group                          (90)
                 <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
         Subject: cfp: Computer Applications in Archaeology 2009

   [2]   From:    Humanist Discussion Group                          (28)
                 <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
         Subject: World Congress on Computer Science and Information
                 Engineering

   [3]   From:    Humanist Discussion Group                          (31)
                 <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
         Subject: Mining Classical Greek Texts


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------
         Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2008 23:29:05 +0100
         From: Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
         Subject: cfp: Computer Applications in Archaeology 2009


*CALL FOR PAPERS AND PROPOSALS FOR SESSIONS, WORKSHOPS, AND ROUNDTABLES
at the 2009 Conference of Computer Applications to Archaeology (CAA)*

The 37th annual  conference on Computer Applications to Archaeology
(CAA) will take place at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in
Williamsburg, Virginia from March 22 to 26, 2009. The conference will
bring together students and scholars to explore current theory and
applications of quantitative methods and information technology in the
field of archaeology. CAA members come from a diverse range of
disciplines, including archaeology, anthropology, art and architectural
history, computer science, geography, geomatics, historic preservation,
museum studies, and urban history. For full information, please see the
conference web site at www.caa2009.org <http://www.caa2009.org/>.

The annual meetings of CAA are normally devoted to topics such as:
agent-based models, bioarchaeology, CIDOC and other digital standards,
databases, 3D data capture and modeling, data management systems and
other field applications, GIS, predictive modeling, open source software
in archaeology, photogrammetry and imaging, prospection and remote
sensing, quantitative methods, high precision surveying, virtual
museums, and virtual reality.

Submissions of proposals for sessions, round tables, and workshops will
be due by *October 15, 2008*. The online submission system, which will
be posted at http://www.caa2009.org/PapersCall.cfm, will open September
3, 2008. Submitters will be notified of the results by mid-November,
when the call for individual papers and posters will be open. Abstracts
for individual papers and posters will be due by *December 15, 2008*.


       Sessions

Session organizers should provide a session invitation of 300 to 500
words relating to a well-defined theme. You should define the topic,
explain its importance, and suggest the specific themes or issues that
might be appropriately addressed by your contributors. A session can
consist of two or three 90-minute blocks of time punctuated by a
15-minute break. It typically consists of six, but no more than nine,
presentations and should include time for debate and discussion as well
as an introduction and a wrap-up. Session proposals may include one or
more abstracts of papers that will be presented, but will normally leave
open the possibility for members of CAA to apply to participate in the
proposed session. All session proposals will be evaluated by the
Scientific Committee for their quality and relevance. This review will
take into account any paper abstracts you include with your session
proposal. Once a proposal has been accepted, it is placed on the
conference web page, and an invitation is issued for additional paper
abstracts to be submitted to your session. The session organizer will
advise the Scientific Committee on which papers should be accepted or
rejected for their session. The organizer will also be responsible for
scheduling the order of presentations, presiding over the session, and
for nominating two or three of the papers for publication in the printed
acts of the conference.


       Round Tables and Workshops

Round table and workshop organizers should provide an invitation of 300
to 500 words introducing the discussion topic.

A /round table/ proposal includes a list of four to eight panel members
(names and affiliations) from at least two different countries. It
should address a topic of general interest to the CAA community. The
round table organizer must ensure that the panel members agree to attend
the conference and take part in the round table. A round table organizer
is the chairperson and acts as moderator. A time slot of 90 minutes will
be allocated to each round table discussion. All round table proposals
will be evaluated by the Scientific Committee for their quality and
relevance.

A /workshop/ typically consists of a software and/or hardware
demonstration in which the audience can actively participate. The
proposal must include information on the duration (not to exceed 135
minutes), experience level, and prerequisites of the targeted audience
as well as the maximum number of participants. Along with the proposal,
a list of the presenters and their affiliations is required.




-- 
Bernard Frischer, Director
IATH
University of Virginia
www.iath.virginia.edu <http://www.iath.virginia.edu>
office tel. +1-434-924-4873 (Alderman Library)
office tel. +1-434-243-4080 (10th and Market)
home tel. +1-434-971-1435
US cell: +1-310-266-0183
---------------------------------
Italian cell: +39-349-473-6590
Rome tel.: +39-06-537-3951
---------------------------------
Postal address:
IATH
100 10th Street, NE, Suite 103
Charlottesville, VA 22902

--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------
         Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2008 23:31:28 +0100
         From: Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
         Subject: World Congress on Computer Science and Information
Engineering

2009 World Congress on Computer Science and Information Engineering
(CSIE 2009)

March 31 - April 2, 2009
Los Angeles/Anaheim, USA

http://world-research-institutes.org/conferences/CSIE/2009

CALL FOR PAPERS & EXPO

The Los Angeles/Anaheim area is known for its many renowned
attractions, such as Disneyland, Universal Studios and the
Hollywood Walk of Fame. Very few cities in the world offer
as much entertainment, excitement and diversity as Los
Angeles/Anaheim does.

CSIE 2009 intends to be a global forum for researchers and
engineers to present and discuss recent advances and new
techniques in computer science and information engineering.
CSIE 2009 consists of the following Technical Symposiums:

  * Communications & Mobile Computing Symposium
  * Computer Applications Symposium
  * Computer Design & VLSI Symposium
  * Data Mining & Data Engineering Symposium
  * Intelligent Systems Symposium
  * Multimedia & Signal Processing Symposium
  * Software Engineering Symposium

CSIE 2009 conference proceedings will be published by the IEEE
Computer Society and all papers in the proceedings will be
included in EI Compendex, ISTP, and IEEE Xplore.

In addition to research papers, CSIE 2009 also seeks exhibitions
of modern products and equipment for computer science and
information engineering.

[...]

--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------
         Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2008 23:37:31 +0100
         From: Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
         Subject: Mining Classical Greek Texts


[At the CCH, http://www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/humanities/depts/cch/, room
212 at 16:00 on Tuesday 2nd Sept: "Mining Classical Greek Texts", a talk
by Professor Helma Dik (Chicago).]


===================_Mining Classical Greek Texts_

Text mining is making its way into the Humanities. I expect that in
the age of large corpora, mining tools will soon have a place on the
scholar's workbench next to the established concordancing tools, but
this is not the case yet. In the Classics, as far as I am aware,
nothing has been published in this area so far. Yet some of the
field's notorious Big Questions To Be Avoided (the relative chronology
of early epic poetry; authorship in Lysias or the Hippocratic corpus;
women's language; ..) would seem to lend themselves to experiments in
text mining. Will such experiments offer literary scholars results
they actually consider interesting or meaningful? Are we perhaps
better off studying documentary corpora or scientific texts? In my
paper I will apply the open-source mining software Philomine developed
at the University of Chicago to the Perseus Greek texts and discuss
some of these Big Questions and possible future avenues.
===================


--
Dr Gabriel BODARD
(Epigrapher & Digital Classicist)

Centre for Computing in the Humanities
King's College London
26-29 Drury Lane
London WC2B 5RL
Email: gabriel.bodard-AT-kcl.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)20 7848 1388
Fax: +44 (0)20 7848 2980

http://www.digitalclassicist.org/
http://www.currentepigraphy.org/

From - Thu Aug 28 00:05:55 2008
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