File /Humanist.vol22.txt, message 248


Date:         Thu, 9 Oct 2008 08:04:03 +0100
From: Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty-AT-MCCARTY.ORG.UK>
Subject: 22.258 e-suspicions
To: humanist-AT-Princeton.EDU


               Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 22, No. 258.
       Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                        www.princeton.edu/humanist/
                     Submit to: humanist-AT-princeton.edu

   [1]   From:    Humanist Discussion Group                           59)
                 <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
         Subject: Re: 22.256 very suspicious, writing's on the screen /
                 very suspicious, ladders bout' to fall...

   [2]   From:    Humanist Discussion Group                            3)
                 <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
         Subject: Re: 22.256 very suspicious, writing's on the screen /
                 very suspicious, ladders bout' to fall...


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------
         Date: Thu, 09 Oct 2008 07:58:23 +0100
         From: Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
         Subject: Re: 22.256 very suspicious, writing's on the screen / 
very suspicious, ladders bout' to fall...


Dear Willard,

In the book Everyware: The Dawning Age of Ubiquitous Computing
<http://alistapart.com/articles/everyware>, Adam Greenfield
<http://alistapart.com/authors/g/adamgreenfield> briefly describes the
'terminology wars' that happen when certain names and/or prefixes and/or
suffixes emerge out of different communities to designate similar
concepts. Competition among them determines the levels of confidence or
suspicion that arise when reading one of these terms, because we
immediately identify the kind of community location or identity, which
is represented in the choice of terminology being used.

Such 'tech terminology' wars are subtle but effective: your remarks come
to confirm what happens when a weak, or ugly, or wrong terminology is
recognized: immediate dismissal of everything that accompanies it.
Survival of the strongest and fittest is therefore assured.

Interesting dynamics... technological culture seems to operate a lot
like biology...

Regards,

Renata Lemos
PUC SP / Brazil


2008/10/8 Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk
<mailto:willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>>

                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 22, No. 256.
          Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London

            Date: Wed, 08 Oct 2008 08:28:14 +0100
            From: Humanist Discussion Group


     What is it about the preface "e-" affixed to nouns designating objects,
     activities or perhaps even people that (as the British say) GETS UP MY
     NOSE? Why is it I suspect that the utterances in which such e-words are
     found are carriers more of ignorance than of knowledge or even of
     genuine curiosity? Yesterday I found myself remarking to a colleague
     that anything which bore the e-designation immediately aroused my
     suspicions. Then this morning I received an invitation to be an editor
     of e-books or e-journals boastingly endorsed by a gaggle of Nobel Prize
     winners. This invitation lost me the millisecond I saw the e-whatever.

     Language is such a subtle instrument, even when used by unsubtle 
people.
     Text-analytic techniques would, I'm sure, not tell me by themselves why
     it is that on reading the invitation subsequently, though lost to its
     charms, I could sense only confirmation that my silent NO was wise and
     would be even if I were not already an editor several times over.

     Ok, I am entitled and en-aged and dis-economized to be grumpy. But,
     I plead in my own defense, grumpiness can be a pre-existing
     condition, but it can also be brought on by manifest wrongs and
     evils. It can be
     RIGHTEOUS. I assert here that in this instance we have something on
     which to apply Clifford Geertz's "intellectual weed-control".

     For an illuminating contrast, see www.openbookpublishers.com/
     <http://www.openbookpublishers.com/>. If
     I were invited by them I'd find it hard to say no. No e-suspicions
     there. But, why no open-suspicions?

     Yours,
     WM





--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------
         Date: Thu, 09 Oct 2008 08:00:18 +0100
         From: Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
         Subject: Re: 22.256 very suspicious, writing's on the screen / 
very suspicious, ladders bout' to fall...
         In-Reply-To: <48EC627C.5050403-AT-mccarty.org.uk>

Personally, I would deprecate the use of hyphens too.

Mike
mike.fraser-AT-oucs.ox.ac.uk

From - Thu Oct 09 08:46:28 2008
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