File /Humanist.vol22.txt, message 348


From: Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
To: humanist-AT-lists.digitalhumanities.org
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2008 06:56:47 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: [Humanist]  22.352 affect in text-analysis


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 22, No. 352.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist-AT-lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2008 15:06:50 -0200
        From: "Renata T. S. Lemos" <renata.lemoz-AT-eletrocooperativa.org>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 22.346 affect in text-analysis?
        In-Reply-To: <20081121164607.92AE626168-AT-woodward.joyent.us>


Dear Willard,

I believe the analysis that Dr. Natasha D. Schull, from MIT, makes on the
relationship of affect and digital cognition is an answer to your last
question and also to your previous question about the changes that are
occurring in our relationship to digital machines, or to the change in the
ontological status of such machines. Her article makes evident that the
boundaries between human and digital are getting less and less clear. This
kind of approach might resemble a future profile of digital humanities.

Digital Gambling: The Coincidence of Desire and
Design http://ann.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/597/1/65
By Natasha Dow Schull

Abstract:
Drawing on ethnographic research conducted in Las Vegas among game
developers and machine gamblers, I correlate a set of digitally enhanced
game features with phenomenological aspects of gamblers' experience,
demonstrating the intimate connection between extreme states of subjective
absorption in play and design elements that manipulate space and time to
accelerate the extraction of money from players. The case of the digital
gambling interface exemplifies the tendency of modern capitalism to bring
space, time, and money into intensified relation and sheds light on the
question of what might or might not be distinctive about the rationalities
and libidinal investments of the "digital age."

Keywords: technology; ethnography; gambling; culture; digital age;
capitalism; modernity

What do you think?

Regards,

Renata

2008/11/21 Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>

>                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 22, No. 346.
>         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist-AT-lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>        Date: Fri, 21 Nov 2008 11:33:02 +0000
>        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
>        >
> In a recent lecture, the philosopher Peter Railton pointed to research
> in cognitive psychology that demonstrates the importance of affect in
> reading. His argument was that affect kicks in prior to any semantic
> relationship to the writing, that which it depicts etc, and helps to
> determine how meaning is formed.
>
> Does this not mean that affect has to enter into text-analysis? And how
> might that be done?
>
> Yours,
> WM
>
>
>
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