File /Humanist.vol22.txt, message 504


From: Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
To: humanist-AT-lists.digitalhumanities.org
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2009 06:12:40 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: [Humanist] 22.515 when games met computing



                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 22, No. 515.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist-AT-lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Dunstan Lowe <d.m.lowe-AT-reading.ac.uk>                     (73)
        Subject: Fwd: [Humanist] 22.511 what happened when games met
                computing?

  [2]   From:    Elijah Meeks <emeeks-AT-ucmerced.edu>                        (58)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 22.511 what happened when games met
                computing?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: 09 Feb 2009 20:44:52 +0000
        From: Dunstan Lowe <d.m.lowe-AT-reading.ac.uk>
        Subject: Fwd: [Humanist] 22.511 what happened when games met computing?


Dear WM,

My colleague Amy Smith forwarded to me your recent appeal for sources on 
games and the early days of computing. I'm afraid I know nothing about 
computing, but in the course of reading about classically-themed video 
games I once came across David Myers, The Nature of Computer Games: Play as 
Semiosis (New York; Oxford 2003), which was quite difficult and abstract, 
but dealt more with the interface between hardware and software than most 
scholarship on computer games does. I think its examples were all 
relatively early. It may be worth a look.

If you become interested in something a bit more in the vein of 'media 
studies', Stephen E. Jones' The Meaning of Video Games: Gaming and Textual 
Strategies (New York 2008) applies 'Theory' to some recent games and 
game-based art installations.

One of the best places to find out about early computing and computer games 
is, mirabile/horribile dictu, Wikipedia - start with Spacewar! and Pong and 
go from there. I dare say the articles about the hardware will reveal how 
games altered the nature and priorities of the technology and its 
programming.

I hope that didn't completely miss the point.
Best,

Dunstan

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: "Amy C. Smith" <a.c.smith-AT-reading.ac.uk>
To: Dunstan Lowe <d.m.lowe-AT-reading.ac.uk>
Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2009 10:55:03 +0000

Dunstan,

You are on this list, aren't you?

Amy

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
> Date: 9 February 2009 10:50:08 GMT
> To: humanist-AT-lists.digitalhumanities.org
> Subject: [Humanist] 22.511 what happened when games met computing?
> Reply-To: humanist-AT-lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 22, No. 511.
>         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist-AT-lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>        Date: Mon, 09 Feb 2009 10:48:46 +0000
>        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
>        Subject: games meet computing?
>
> I would be very grateful for recommendations of sources for the  
> history
> of game-playing in the early decades of computing. I am particularly
> interested in histories that look at the confluence of the two rather
> than implementation and development of computer games. This confluence
> is in a sense utterly obvious -- one form of rule-governed behaviour
> meeing a rule-governing machine. But what is *not* so obvious about  
> this
> meeting? How did each affect the other?
>
> Thanks very much for any guidance.
>
> Yours,
> WM
> -- 
> Willard McCarty, Professor of Humanities Computing,
> King's College London, staff.cch.kcl.ac.uk/~wmccarty/;
> Editor, Humanist, www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist;
> Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, www.isr-journal.org.


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2009 12:26:41 -0800
        From: Elijah Meeks <emeeks-AT-ucmerced.edu>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 22.511 what happened when games met computing?
        In-Reply-To: <20090209105008.D70252A6E3-AT-woodward.joyent.us>


Dr. McCarty,

I've yet to find a good history of early gaming that deals with rules
development and constraint as it applies to the game developer/game
player dialectic.  I think this has something to do with academics
focusing on the more visceral games (Shooting games, arcade games)
with rules based primarily on physics and biology and not the games
that were already rooted in rules-based systems (Adventure games from
pen-and-paper role-playing games, strategy games from board games and
counter/chit-based tactical games).  I did, however, find some
interesting sources that dealt with this subject, especially designer
interviews from the earliest implementations of these kind of games....

Take care,
Elijah Meeks
UC Merced

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