File /Humanist.vol22.txt, message 509


From: Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
To: humanist-AT-lists.digitalhumanities.org
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2009 09:50:24 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: [Humanist] 22.523 when games met computing


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 22, No. 523.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist-AT-lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Thu, 12 Feb 2009 09:05:31 -0800
        From: Mark Horney <mhorney-AT-uoregon.edu>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 22.522 when games met computing
        In-Reply-To: <20090212081323.D5AC52D7A8-AT-woodward.joyent.us>


Another starting place are the works of Martin Gardner. "Wheels, Life  
and Other Mathematical Amusements" (1983) is one of his titles.

I should also think the work of Seymour Papert (Mindstorms, 1980), and  
the whole Constructionist school of thought would be applicable. Not  
so much in terms specific computer games, but more as playing with  
computers through programming.

Lastly, "What Video Games Have to Teach us About Learning and  
Literacy" (2003), by James Gee.

Mark Horney
University of Oregon



_______________________________________________
List posts to: humanist-AT-lists.digitalhumanities.org
List info and archives at at: http://digitalhumanities.org/humanist
Listmember interface at: http://digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Restricted/listmember_interface.php
Subscribe at: http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/membership_form.php




   

Humanist Main Page

 

Display software: ArchTracker © Malgosia Askanas, 2000-2005