File /Humanist.vol22.txt, message 56


Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2008 06:40:45 +0100
From: "Humanist Discussion Group \(by way of Willard McCarty              <willard.mccarty-AT-kcl.ac.uk>\)" <willard-AT-LISTS.VILLAGE.VIRGINIA.EDU>
Subject: 22.056 new on WWW: Ubiquity 9.22
To: <humanist-AT-Princeton.EDU>


                Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 22, No. 56.
       Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
  www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/humanities/cch/research/publications/humanist.html
                        www.princeton.edu/humanist/
                     Submit to: humanist-AT-princeton.edu



         Date: Wed, 04 Jun 2008 06:35:04 +0100
         From: ubiquity <ubiquity-AT-HQ.ACM.ORG>
         Subject: UBIQUITY 9.22


Volume 9, Issue 22
June 3 -- 9, 2008


In this issue we have a paper by Rafael Capurro
and Norm Friesen along with one by Ubiquity
Associate Editor Arun Kumar Tripathi, who
provides these brief introductions to the three pieces:

* CAPURRO: Dr. Rafael Capurro is Founder and
Director of the International Center for
Information Ethics, and Editor of International
Review of Information Ethics. He is a professor
of information management and teaches information
ethics from the hermeneutics perspective at the
Stuttgart Media University. In his Ubiquity paper
"<http://www.acm.org/ubiquity/volume_9/v9i22_capurro.html>Information
Technology as an Ethical Challenge" he
demonstrates that the impact of information
technology on society can be transformed through
the ethical perspective of technologies of the
self. His paper tries to provide us the answer to
the question of how can we ensure that the
benefits of information technology are not only
distributed equitably, but that they can also be
used by people to shape their own lives.

* FRIESEN: Dr. Norm Friesen, a Canada Research
Chair in E-Learning Practices at Thompson Rivers
University, argues in his paper
"<http://www.acm.org/ubiquity/volume_9/v9i22_friesen.html>Critical
Theory: Ideology Critique and the Myths of
E-Learning" that critical theory designates a
philosophy and a research methodology that
focuses on the interrelated issues of technology,
politics and social change.  Dr Friesen shows in
depth how critical theory can be used to
"de-mystify" three particular truths or myths of e-learning.

*TRIPATHI: Complementing the Friesen paper,
Ubiquity Associate Editor Arun Tripathi
contributes his piece
"<http://www.acm.org/ubiquity/volume_9/v9i22_tripathi.html>Dimension
of the Philosophy of Technologies: Critical
Theory and Democratization of Technology."

   

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