File /Humanist.vol22.txt, message 585


From: Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty-AT-mccarty.org.uk>
To: humanist-AT-lists.digitalhumanities.org
Date: Sat,  7 Mar 2009 08:45:06 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: [Humanist] 22.600 new on WWW: TL Infobits for February


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 22, No. 600.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist-AT-lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2009 20:43:36 +0000
        From: Carolyn Kotlas <kotlas-AT-email.unc.edu>
        Subject: TL Infobits -- February 2009


TL INFOBITS	February 2009		No. 32		ISSN: 1931-3144

About INFOBITS

INFOBITS is an electronic service of The University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill ITS Teaching and Learning division. Each month the
ITS-TL's Information Resources Consultant monitors and selects from a
number of information and instructional technology sources that come to
her attention and provides brief notes for electronic dissemination to
educators.

NOTE: You can read the Web version of this issue and all back issues of
Infobits at http://its.unc.edu/tl/infobits

......................................................................

The Current Economy and Education 
New E-Learning Predictions Made, Old Predictions Graded
Assessment and E-Portfolios
New Educational Research Journal
Federal Resource for Teaching Materials
Recommended Reading

......................................................................

THE CURRENT ECONOMY AND EDUCATION

The effects of the current economic and demographic situations on
education are profound and troubling. Here are some recent articles
that may be of interest.

In "Open Education: A New Paradigm" (UNIVERSITY BUSINESS, vol. 12, no.
1, January 2009, pp. 13-14), Michael King writes, "Between 2010 and
2025, nearly 80 million 'baby boomers' will leave the workforce . . . .
When this exodus occurs, only 20 percent of workers remaining will
possess the skills required for most of the jobs being created today."
This will create demands on educational institutions not only to
replace vacated faculty positions, but also to help improve the skills
of the workforce. He thinks that open technologies that foster services
sharing and innovation can lower the costs of delivering education and
improve quality.

The article is online at
http://www.universitybusiness.com/viewarticle.aspx?articleid=1192

-----

Although not specifically mentioning e-learning, one of the
recommendations in "Postsecondary Education Spending Priorities for the
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Policy Advisory to State
Fiscal Policymakers" has implications for online delivery of
instruction: "Make investments in course redesign and other curricula
changes that will make for a more cost-effective curriculum, to be in
place no later than 2011. This includes redesigning large undergraduate
courses, creating cost-effective developmental education modules that
can be delivered statewide; and redesigning the general education
curriculum to enhance community college transfer."

The paper, published by the Delta Project on Postsecondary Education
Costs, Productivity, and Accountability; The National Center for Public
Policy and Higher Education; and the National Center for Higher
Education Management Systems (NCHEMS), is available at
http://nchems.org/news/documents/ARRAStatementFebruary.2009.pdf

-----

Also of interest:

"What Will Happen to State Budgets When the Money Runs Out?"
By Donald J. Boyd
February 19, 2009
The Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government
http://www.rockinst.org/pdf/government_finance/2009-02-19-What_Will_Happen_to.pdf

"States should use the breathing room provided by the stimulus package
to mute and spread out baseline spending cuts and/or tax increases they
will need to make, to restructure programs, and to allow for orderly
decisionmaking. But they cannot count on it to substitute for these
difficult decisions."

......................................................................

NEW E-LEARNING PREDICTIONS MADE, OLD PREDICTIONS GRADED

Each year ELEARN MAGAZINE invites e-learning experts to provide
predictions for the coming year. This year thirty people from
educational institutions and businesses in several countries weighed in
with their forecasts. Not surprisingly, most addressed the challenges
resulting from the current global economy crisis. 

"Predictions for 2009" by Lisa Neal Gualtier is available at
http://elearnmag.org/subpage.cfm?section=articles&article=72-1

In "Reviewing Last Year's E-Learning Predictions," Stephen Downes
examines the predictions made for 2008 and gives each expert a grade
for his or her prediction. Downes awarded "A" grades for such
predictions as "we will see universities begin to provide institutional
support for Facebook and other Web 2.0 tools, not as replacements for
the LMS but as adjuncts to them" (eLiterate blogger Michael Feldstein)
and "2008 will be the year that serious games get serious attention
from corporate training departments" (Red Hot Learning vice-president
Philip Lambert).

He gave an "F" to MIT's Richard Larson's prediction, "The year 2008
will be the year in which open source educational materials will be
co-invented by educators from around the world and will be as easily
uploaded onto a searchable website as are the videos on YouTube."

Read all the 2008 predictions and Downes' comments at
http://elearnmag.org/subpage.cfm?section=articles&article=73-1

eLearn magazine is published by ACM (Association for Computing
Machinery, Inc.), a not-for-profit educational association serving
those who work, teach, and learn in the various computing-related
fields. For more information, contact: eLearn magazine, eLearn Magazine
ACM, 2 Penn Plaza, Suite 701, New York, NY 10121-07016 USA; Web:
http://www.elearnmag.com/

......................................................................

ASSESSMENT AND E-PORTFOLIOS

"Several trends in higher education shape the context in which an
e-portfolio implementation may be advantageous. First, e-portfolios can
help address the call to facilitate and document authentic learning
experiences. . . . Second, e-portfolios can help respond to the new era
of accountability . . . . Third, e-portfolios can help universities and
colleges connect to today's undergraduates . . ."

In "Assessing the Future: E-Portfolio Trends, Uses, and Options in
Higher Education" (ECAR Research Bulletin, Issue 4), Michael Reese and
Ron Levy analyze the benefits and obstacles to adopting and using
e-portfolios. They base their conclusions on interviews with faculty
and staff and on six pilot programs at The Johns Hopkins University.

The report is available online to members of ECAR subscribing
institutions at
http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ecar_so/erb/ERB0904.pdf
To find out if your institution is a subscriber, go to
http://www.educause.edu/ECARSubscribingOrganizations/957

ECAR (EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research) "provides timely research
and analysis to help higher education leaders make better decisions
about information technology. ECAR assembles leading scholars,
practitioners, researchers, and analysts to focus on issues of critical
importance to higher education, many of which carry increasingly
complicated and consequential implications." For more information go to
http://www.educause.edu/content.asp?SECTION_ID=4

......................................................................

NEW EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL

The JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN HIGHER EDUCATION, which began
publication in January 2009, is an online peer-reviewed journal
sponsored by the University of Glamorgan in Cardiff, Wales. Formed to
"promote improved practice by encouraging informed debate into
pedagogic and related matters in higher education," the journal
welcomes papers "from all disciplines and subject areas covering higher
education policy and management, learning and teaching (including
technology-enhanced learning and work-based learning), assessment,
curriculum development and quality enhancement." Papers are available
at no cost at http://jarhe.research.glam.ac.uk/

For more information, contact: Dr Elaine Huntley, Centre for Excellence
in Learning and Teaching, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, CF37
1DL, Wales, UK; tel: +44 (0)1443 482316; email: jarhe-AT-glam.ac.uk; Web:
http://jarhe.research.glam.ac.uk/

......................................................................

FEDERAL RESOURCE FOR TEACHING MATERIALS

FREE (Federal Resources for Educational Excellence) is a collection of
teaching and learning resources from U.S. government agencies. The
website provides links to over 1,500 resources in several categories:
arts & music, health & physical education, history & social studies,
language arts, mathematics, and science. Resource formats include
primary documents, photographs, videos, and animations.

While the audiences for much of the material are the K-12 grades,
educators at any level can find materials to illustrate their
instruction. Works by the U.S. government are not eligible for U.S.
copyright protection so using these materials does not require seeking
permission from the creating agency.

You can access FREE's materials at http://www.free.ed.gov/

......................................................................

RECOMMENDED READING

"Recommended Reading" lists items that have been recommended to me or
that Infobits readers have found particularly interesting and/or
useful, including books, articles, and websites published by Infobits
subscribers. Send your recommendations to carolyn_kotlas-AT-unc.edu for
possible inclusion in this column. 

"What's Wrong with Copyright: Educator Strategies for Dealing with
	Analog Copyright Law in a Digital World"
By J. Patrick McGrail and Ewa McGrail
INNOVATE vol. 5, no. 3, February/March 2009 
http://www.innovateonline.info/index.php?view=article&id=630 
Registration is required to access the paper; registration is free.

"In this article, we explore how the technological, social, cultural,
and legal developments of the digital age challenge educators and
students who seek to make use of copyrighted material for educational
purposes and offer educators strategies for dealing with today’s
copyright challenges. We conclude with a call to revise the copyright
law and suggest the direction that a revised copyright law should take
to support responsible, creative use of both traditional and new media
content, both within and beyond the physical walls of the classroom."

......................................................................

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