File /Humanist.vol22.txt, message 59


Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2008 15:23:27 +0100
From: "Humanist Discussion Group \(by way of Willard McCarty              <willard.mccarty-AT-kcl.ac.uk>\)" <willard-AT-LISTS.VILLAGE.VIRGINIA.EDU>
Subject: 22.059 new on WWW: TL Infobits
To: <humanist-AT-Princeton.EDU>


                Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 22, No. 59.
       Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
  www.kcl.ac.uk/schools/humanities/cch/research/publications/humanist.html
                        www.princeton.edu/humanist/
                     Submit to: humanist-AT-princeton.edu



         Date: Sun, 08 Jun 2008 15:08:01 +0100
         From: "Carolyn Kotlas" <kotlas-AT-email.unc.edu>
         Subject: TL Infobits -- May 2008

TL INFOBITS	May 2008		No. 23		ISSN: 1931-3144

About INFOBITS

INFOBITS is an electronic service of The University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill ITS Teaching and Learning division. Each month the
ITS-TL's Information Resources Consultant monitors and selects from a
number of information and instructional technology sources that come to
her attention and provides brief notes for electronic dissemination to
educators.

NOTE: You can read the Web version of this issue at
http://its.unc.edu/tl/infobits/bitmay08.php

You can read all back issues of Infobits at
http://its.unc.edu/tl/infobits/

......................................................................

Considering the Future of Learning
Openness and Learning in Today's World
Critiquing the Claims of E-Learning
Assessing the Future of Scholarly Communication
Google Book Search Bibliography
Recommended Reading

......................................................................

CONSIDERING THE FUTURE OF LEARNING

"In contrast to earlier e-learning approaches that simply replicated
traditional models, the Web 2.0 movement with its associated array of
social software tools offers opportunities to move away from the last
century's highly centralized, industrial model of learning and toward
individual learner empowerment through designs that focus on
collaborative, networked interaction"
	-- McLoughlin and Lee, "Future Learning Landscapes"

The future of learning is theme of the June/July 2008 issue of
INNOVATE. Articles include:

"Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social
	Software" by Catherine McLoughlin and Mark J. W. Lee
	"McLoughlin and Lee posit that future learning environments
must capitalize on the potential of Web 2.0 by combining social
software tools with connectivist pedagogical models."

"Rhizomatic Education: Community as Curriculum" by Dave Cormier
	"In the rhizomatic model, knowledge is negotiated, and the
learning experience is a social as well as a personal knowledge
creation process with mutable goals and constantly negotiated
premises."

"A Singular Vision for a Disparate Future: Technology Adoption Patterns
	in Higher Learning Through 2035" by Robert G. Henshaw
	Henshaw "examines factors likely to influence technology
adoption within U.S. higher education over the next 30 years and their
impact on education providers and consumers." [Editor's note: the
author of this paper is my colleague at UNC-Chapel Hill ITS Teaching
and Learning division.]

The issue is available at http://innovateonline.info/index.php
Registration is required to access articles; registration is free.

Innovate: Journal of Online Education [ISSN 1552-3233], an open-access,
peer-reviewed online journal, is published bimonthly by the Fischler
School of Education and Human Services at Nova Southeastern University.
The journal focuses on the creative use of information technology (IT)
to enhance educational processes in academic, commercial, and
governmental settings. For more information, contact James L. Morrison,
Editor-in-Chief; email: innovate-AT-nova.edu; Web:
http://innovateonline.info/

......................................................................

OPENNESS AND LEARNING IN TODAY'S WORLD

How open access and interactive Web 2.0 applications are changing the
learning environment is focus of the latest issue of ELEARNING PAPERS.
The papers' authors consider the impact of these technologies both on
individual learners and the institutions that facilitate the learning
process. Papers include:

"Web 2.0 and New Learning Paradigms" by Antonio Bartolome
	"This article is sceptic about the current changes at eLearning
institutions and businesses, but points out some of the changes that
will take place outside their courses and programmes."

"Universities and Web 2.0: Institutional Challenges" by Juan Freire
	"Teachers, researchers and students started some years ago to
use social software tools, but in few cases these experiences have
allowed any scaling from the individual to the institutional level. The
promises and potential of web 2.0 in universities need an adequate
strategy for their development which has to confront the bottlenecks
and fears common in these institutions, which could explain the lack of
adaptation."

"Is the world open?" by Richard Straub
	"The rise of social networking sites, virtual worlds, blogs,
wikis and 3D Internet give us a first idea of the potential of the
'interactive and collaborative web' dubbed Web 2.0. Now we have the
infrastructure and tools to operate in new ways in open systems. While
many of the thoughts about openness and the need for more open social
systems have been around for some time, this new infrastructure and new
tools accelerate the movement."

The issue is available at
http://www.elearningpapers.eu/index.php?page=home&vol=8

eLearning Papers [ISSN 1887-1542] is an open access journal created as
part of the elearningeuropa.info portal. The portal is "an initiative
of the European Commission to promote the use of multimedia
technologies and Internet at the service of education and training."
For more information, contact: eLearning Papers, P.A.U. Education, C/
Muntaner 262, 3rd, 08021 Barcelona, Spain; email:
editorial-AT-elearningeuropa.info; Web: http://www.elearningpapers.eu/

......................................................................

CRITIQUING THE CLAIMS OF E-LEARNING

"Critical theory designates a philosophy and a research methodology
that focuses on the interrelated issues of technology, politics and
social change. Despite its emphasis on technology, critical theory
arguably remains underutilized in areas of practical research that lie
at the confluence of social, political and technological concerns, such
as the study of the use of the usability of information and
communication technologies (ICTs) or of their use in educational
institutions."

In "Critical Theory: Ideology Critique and the Myths of E-Learning"
(UBIQUITY, vol. 9, no. 22, June 3-9, 2008), Norm Friesen uses critical
theory to de-mystify three claims of e-learning:

	-- "that we live in a 'knowledge economy'"

	-- "that users enjoy ubiquitous, 'anywhere anytime' access"

	-- "that social and institutional change is motivated by a
	number of fixed 'laws' of progress in computer technology"

The paper is available at
http://www.acm.org/ubiquity/volume_9/v9i22_friesen.html

Ubiquity [ISSN 1530-2180] is a free, Web-based publication of the
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), "dedicated to fostering
critical analysis and in-depth commentary on issues relating to the
nature, constitution, structure, science, engineering, technology,
practices, and paradigms of the IT profession." For more information,
contact: Ubiquity, email: ubiquity-AT-acm.org; Web:
http://www.acm.org/ubiquity/

For more information on the ACM, contact: ACM, One Astor Plaza, 1515
Broadway, New York, NY 10036, USA; tel: 800-342-6626 or 212-626-0500;
Web: http://www.acm.org/

......................................................................

ASSESSING THE FUTURE OF SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATION

The Center for Studies in Higher Education is conducting research to
"understand the needs and desires of faculty for in-progress scholarly
communication (i.e., forms of communication employed as research is
being executed) as well as archival publication." With the study now
into its second year, the Center has released an interim report with
some of the early findings based on interviews with over 150 faculty
members in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities.

Some of the questions that the study seeks to answer include:

	-- "What will scholars want to do in their research and with
their research results, and what new forms of communication do or do
not support those desires?"

	-- "How will scholars want to disseminate and receive input on
their work at various lifecycle stages?"

	-- "How do institutions and other stakeholders support these
faculty needs, if at all?"

The Spring 2008 "Draft Interim Report: Assessing the Future Landscape
of Scholarly Communication," by Diane Harley, et al., is available at
http://cshe.berkeley.edu/publications/publications.php?id=300

The Center for Studies in Higher Education at the University of
California Berkeley is a "multi-disciplinary research and policy center
on higher education [that is] oriented to California, the nation, and
comparative international issues." For more information, contact:
Center for Studies in Higher Education, University of California,
Berkeley, 771 Evans Hall #4650, Berkeley, CA 94720-4650 USA; tel:
510-642-5040; fax: 510-643-6845; email: cshe-AT-berkeley.edu; Web:
http://cshe.berkeley.edu/

......................................................................

GOOGLE BOOK SEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY

Charles W. Bailey, Jr. recently published the second version of "The
Google Book Search Bibliography." The resource provides citations and
links to over a hundred English-language references to scholarly papers
and newspaper articles. The bibliography presents a comprehensive
examination of the Google service and the "legal, library, and social
issues associated with it." The bibliography is available at
http://www.digital-scholarship.org/gbsb/gbsb.htm

Bailey is a prolific compiler of scholarly communication
bibliographies, notably the "Scholarly Electronic Publishing
Bibliography" (now in its 70th edition). You can access all his
publications at http://www.digital-scholarship.org/

......................................................................

RECOMMENDED READING

"Recommended Reading" lists items that have been recommended to me or
that Infobits readers have found particularly interesting and/or
useful, including books, articles, and websites published by Infobits
subscribers. Send your recommendations to carolyn_kotlas-AT-unc.edu for
possible inclusion in this column.

"Want to Remember Everything You'll Ever Learn? Surrender to This
	Algorithm"
By Gary Wolf
Wired Magazine, 16.05
http://www.wired.com/medtech/health/magazine/16-05/ff_wozniak

Piotr Wozniak's software program SuperMemo is "based on the insight
that there is an ideal moment to practice what you've learned. Practice
too soon and you waste your time. Practice too late and you've
forgotten the material and have to relearn it. The right time to
practice is just at the moment you're about to forget. . . . Twenty
years ago, Wozniak realized that computers could easily calculate the
moment of forgetting if he could discover the right algorithm.
SuperMemo is the result of his research."

......................................................................

   

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